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The IRS has provided details clarifying the federal tax status involving special payments made by 21 states in 2022. Taxpayers in many states will not need to report these payments on their 2022 tax returns.


The IRS intends to change how it defines vans, sports utility vehicles (SUVs), pickup trucks and “other vehicles” for purposes of the Code Sec. 30D new clean vehicle credit. These changes are reflected in updated IRS Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) for the new, previously owned and commercial clean vehicle credits.


The IRS established the program to allocate environmental justice solar and wind capacity limitation (Capacity Limitation) to qualified solar and wind facilities eligible for the Low-Income Communities Bonus Credit Program component of the energy investment credit.


The IRS announced a program to allocate $10 billion of credits for qualified investments in eligible qualifying advanced energy projects (the Code Sec. 48C(e) program). At least $4 billion of these credits may be allocated only to projects located in certain energy communities.


The IRS has released new rules and conditions for implementing the real estate developer alternative cost method. This is an optional safe harbor method of accounting for real estate developers to determine when common improvement costs may be included in the basis of individual units of real property in a real property development project held for sale to determine the gain or loss from sales of those units.


The IRS announced that taxpayers electronically filing their Form 1040-X, Amended U.S Individual Income Tax Return, will for the first time be able to select direct deposit for any resulting refund. 


The OECD/G20 Inclusive Framework released a package of technical and administrative guidance that achieves clarity on the global minimum tax on multinational corporations known as Pillar Two. Further, it provides critical protections for important tax incentives, including green tax credit incentives established in the Inflation Reduction Act. 


Just because you're married doesn't mean you have to file a joint return. This is a common misconception along with thinking that "married filing separately" applies to couples who are separated or seeking a divorce. As a married couple, you have two choices: file a joint return or file separate returns. Naturally, there are benefits and detriments to each and your tax advisor can chart the best course of action for you.

The IRS has some good news for you. Under new rules, you may be able to gain a partial tax break on the full $250,000 capital gain exclusion ($500,000 if you file jointly with your spouse), even if you haven't satisfied the normal "two out of five year test" necessary to gain that tax benefit. You may qualify for an exception.


As a business owner you have likely heard about the tax advantages of setting up a retirement plan for you and your employees. Many small business owners, however, have also heard some of the horror stories and administrative nightmares that can go along with plan sponsorship. Through marketing information that you receive, you may have learned that a simplified employer plan (SEP) is a retirement plan you can sponsor without the administrative hassle associated with establishing other company plans, including Keoghs.


U.S. citizens and resident aliens working abroad may exclude up to $91,400 of their foreign earned income for 2009. Additionally, expatriates may deduct or exclude their foreign housing costs in excess of a base amount. The housing exclusion is for reimbursed expenses while the deduction is for unreimbursed costs.

Higher-income individuals whose adjusted gross income (AGI) exceeds a threshold level must reduce the amount of their otherwise allowable itemized deductions.


Certified Public Accountants & Business Consultants. An Accountancy Corporation